Basset Hound 101

Here at Kenne Björkwood we have one sole aim: to breed healthy, happy basset hounds that will go on to live in loving homes.

If You’re Thinking of Buying a Basset Hound

We’re happy to talk to you and show you our dogs. If you’ve never been owned by a basset hound before it’s a good idea to come and see what the reality is like. Although basset hounds are incredibly loving, easy-going dogs they do have some issues: for example, drool rules! Your nice walls and cupboards will get splashed with drool very frequently and if that’s a problem, that bassets probably aren’t for you.

Bassets also tend to have a rather unique aroma. Thankfully, we’re pretty immune to it now because we have so many but come the rainy season even we remember just how much bassets can smell. You’re going to need to invest in plenty of fragrant oils and candles to keep your home smelling sweet.

Why not check out the Best basset hound pictures & posts from Kennel Björkwood website?

Taking on a Puppy

If you’re lucky enough to welcome an 8-week old puppy to your home then you’re in for a fun but also slightly frustrating time. Because bassets are effectively a large-breed dog on short legs they require lots of gentle care during their first year. No walks, no jumping off the sofa, no running up and down stairs. You have to be very watchful to ensure they don’t over do it and hurt themselves unintentionally.

Ideally, you live in a house with a garden so your young basset can play. If you live in an apartment you’re going to have to be careful not to over-exercise your young woof.

Aside from ensuring your pup doesn’t over do it, you’re going to have to toilet train it. And that’s not always easy. We’ve seen one or two “naturals” who grasp the concept very quickyl. But bassets often take a long time to get the hang of toilet training. Such characters will test your patient and it’s important that you are always calm and positive handling a basset.

Young bassets are also heavy chewers. We’ve seen table legs, walls, cupboards and jumpers all suffer at the hands of pups.

Living with a Basset

If there is one thing we have learned being owned by bassets is that you can never be in a rush. Forget about that quick ten minute walk round the block before you have to get to an important meeting. That’s the walk your favourite pupster will decide to refuse to move. Or sleep on the pavement. Or sniff instead of pee when ordinarily he can’t wait to do his business. Bassets have a knack of working to their own agenda. When you’re relaxed and have plenty of time, this isn’t a problem. It can even be quite endearing. But when you have something else to do than hang with your hound he’ll infuriate you.

We find that adult bassets work best with a regular routine. At Kennel Björkwood the woofs get a walk first thing in the morning and a long walk in the forest in the late afternoon. In between they’re pretty happy chewing on a bone or playing with a Kong. Sleeping is a favourite pastime too. Any variation from this routine and they tend to get mischievous. Thankfully, working from home as a communications consultant, I don’t have to vary things too much but from time to time I have meetings in town or with clients and that’s when I really have to plan things carefully. You can never rush out with a basset.

Health Issues

Aside from not over exercising a pup or young basset, you have to be prepared to deal with a number of health issues if you take on a basset.

Ears need to be cleaned once a week, preferably with a good non-alcohol cleaning solution. Eyes must be kept clean daily. Although bassets don’t have shaggy coats they do drop hair very frequently so you’re going to get to know your vacuum cleaner very well.

A basset should never be exercised after it’s just eaten. All deep-chested dogs like bassets, Labradors, Alsatians (Schaffer) have a tendency to bloat so you it’s important they don’t exercise on a full stomach.

We recommend that you rest your dog for 2 hours after meals.

Bassets can also have problems with their skin. It’s important to towel dry a basset after a walk in the snow or rain. Never let moisture linger on a basset’s coat: it will just smell and serve as a breeding ground for bacteria.

Why You Should Consider a Basset

If you’re new to bassets, in spite of all the hard work and care they require, they are the most wonderful of breeds. I personally can’t think of as loving a breed of dog. Bassets are wonderfully social and tend to get on with other dogs, cats, children, friends and family. Yes, they bark and sometimes howl. Usually at the most inconvenient moment. But they’re loyal and friendly and will make you smile.

If you’d like to know more about basset hounds, you’re very welcome to get in touch for a chat and possibly come and see our woofs.

Jon Buscall
Täby, Sweden

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  • chuck

    I have a basset that is almost two named Silas. Silas loves to run and play I was curious what your thoughts on taking him to run a 5k would be?

  • GLB

    Oh dear Oh dear Oh dear, I am at a loss. My son’s Christmas gift was a basest puppy. The girlfriend was suppose to keep him part time and him the rest, but as go many relationships, I now have the dog. I have been reading all over the internet about these dogs and your page is GREAT! So I have a few questions. I have a 15 year old chihuahua that was kennel trained and potty trained in a week, I have a 12 month old Great Dane that was a bit more difficult but done with no problems. This 4 month puppy has been left to its own accord during the day, not kennel trained, not completely potty trained and howls for hours before he just gives up. Is it too late for me?! And what the heck is a KONG? My other dogs like being outside, even without me, but this one, you leave his site and it’s on. He likes to sleep with my son but just wakes up in the morning does circle on the bed and if the boy does not get up fast enough he just relieves himself right there on the bed. Thank God for waterproof mattress covers. Now that might work in their homes but that’s not going to fly in my house. And if they are sleeping in the bed how will I ever get this dog kennel trained? My others dogs sleep in their kennels at nite. And are they once a day eaters or twice, or just should I have food for him at all times. I am hopelessly lost. I want to train him so he can go live with his rightful owner, but all the websites lead me to believe this could be a lengthy process and I travel extensively, I don’t think he is going to be a great travel dog. HELP!

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    Lovely looking lad! If he has the stamina, then go for it. I’ve personally not seen a basset out on a jog, but why not if he’s fit.

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    The Kong is a toy: http://www.kongcompany.com/

    Sounds like you’ve got a lot on your hands. Toilet training with bassets can take time. I don’t know why. It just seems to come up a bazillion times in the breed.

    http://poochie-pets.net/ are the best training tool I know as it teaches the dog to signal clearly when it wants something.

    Otherwise, it’s a case of putting him on a schedule to get him out at certain times, rewarding him and then reinforcing it.

    It’s never too late to train a dog; he’s just not had clear signals and obviously needs a bit of help.

    Getting him to stay outside is also going to work in the long run but he’ll need positive reinforcement. To be honest, if it sounds a difficult process I’d seek help from an accredited trainer in your region.

    Best of luck !!!

  • Sascha

    I have a 12 week old Bassett named Turkish.We stay in a complex where a lot of noise can be a problem. I’m just worried about how bad the barking and howling is going to become. Any advice? ??

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    Make sure you train T to cope with being alone. Lots of games and fun but then clear time outs when there is quiet time with something T likes. I often give mine a marrow bone to chew. They are really big and strong and don’t shatter so the dog concentrates on liking out the good stuff. I give them raw but frozen. Some dogs get an upset tummy from them but mine are fine.


    Sent from Mailbox for iPhone

  • Ricky n Jennifer

    Hi everyone…I would like to share our story…my name is Ricky and my wife is Jennifer..we are from sunny Sri Lanka. It was about 2 months back when I fell ill with a viral fever called Dengue. I escaped by the skin of my teeth loosoing my life. But during my stay in hospital out of nowhere the liking towards our friend in the basset came in to my heart. And just 3 days out of the hospital I was gifted our Basset “Pebbles”…Life has changed for us…it is difficult no doubt but my wife being a woof lover takes care of pebbles like our 3rd child. And she is a bundle of joy and love she has in her is unimaginable…we have had many woofs but from the looks of it Pebbles is gonna be on top of our list.

  • Ricky n Jennifer

    Hi everyone…I would like to share our story…my name is Ricky and my wife is Jennifer..we are from sunny Sri Lanka. It was about 2 months back when I fell ill with a viral fever called Dengue. I escaped by the skin of my teeth loosoing my life. But during my stay in hospital out of nowhere the liking towards our friend in the basset came in to my heart. And just 3 days out of the hospital I was gifted our Basset “Pebbles”…Life has changed for us…it is difficult no doubt but my wife being a woof lover takes care of pebbles like our 3rd child. And she is a bundle of joy… and the love she has to offer is unimaginable…we have had many woofs but from the looks of it Pebbles is gonna be on top of our list.

  • Ricky n Jennifer

    Hi everyone…I would like to share our story…my name is Ricky and my wife is Jennifer..we are from sunny Sri Lanka. It was about 2 months back when I fell ill with a viral fever called Dengue. I escaped by the skin of my teeth loosoing my life. But during my stay in hospital out of nowhere the liking towards our friend in the basset came in to my heart. And just 3 days out of the hospital I was gifted our Basset “Pebbles”…Life has changed for us…it is difficult no doubt but my wife being a woof lover takes care of pebbles like our 3rd child. And she is a bundle of joy and love she has in her is unimaginable…we have had many woofs but from the looks of it Pebbles is gonna be on top of our list.

  • Adrienne

    I am wanting to get a basset hound puppy sometime in the near future. I live in an apartment in Texas, which means limited space and intense weather, particularly heat. I’ve read bassets do well in apartments as long as they are exercised. My questions are: how long of a walk(s) should a new puppy take? How many times a day? Is it ok to take a puppy on a long walk after eating (I’m worried about bloat)? I have an 8-5 job where I can usually make it home during lunch, but there are days where I’m working out of town all day, so how much of a concern is it that the dog might have to go 8hrs without being let out? Like I previously mentioned, I live where it is really hot most of the time. The dog will be kept inside, but I’m worried about the puppy’s feet on hot asphalt. Should I look into getting shoes for the dog’s feet when we go on a walk, or is it best to let the feet grow accustomed to the asphalt. Also, I live on the second floor, will the dog be able to navigate the stairs alright? Or is it best to carry him? Will the dog do okay in a crate at night as long as the crate is in the same room as me? I’ve never had a dog that is only mine that I get to train from the beginning, so please forgive me if I ask questions most dog owners should already know the answer to. I just want to make sure I can take care of the little guy properly.

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    Hi Adrienne,
    To be honest this doesn’t sound ideal.

    A basset will typically howl if left for 8 hours. In Sweden that’s actually against the law. They are very focused on their “pack” and if they’re left alone they are often very unhappy. Bassets do play, but toys just don’t have the same appeal as just hanging out close to someone.

    I’ve had owners who live in an apartment and they have managed quite well but you need an elevator in the building. The stairs are too much for a young basset because they’ll put an awful lot of stress on shoulders and elbows. As dwarf dogs they need plenty of time to mature and grow. You have to be incredibly careful with a young basset.

    As for asphalt, well that’s fine. I am sure he’d let you know if he was uncomfortable.

    Sorry to err on the negative here; I’m just speaking from my experience and the kind of discussions we have with potential puppy buyers.

    *Jon Buscall, PhD*
    Web: jontusmedia.com
    Twitter: @jonbuscall
    Skype: jonbuscall
    Email: jon@jontusmedia.com
    Tel: +46 76 863 72 85

  • sophie

    Have not had a puppy in a long time but ive had animals all my life. I just got a 7 week old basset puppy and i adoooore him. I can see him being a handfull at some point though. We are not really allowed dogs in the apt so my mother offered to keep it with the dad (long story short, my mothers dog is the puppys father) until we move. I can come visit, take him out, take care of him, even bring him home sometimes. Bought him toys, food, everything so hes comfy here. Do you think it would be bad for the dog to live in 2 places? Part time at my mothers and 2-3 days a week with me? Would that affect him much, in a bad way?

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    Hey Sophie,
    He’ll adapt. I think dogs that go to doggy daycare can do really well. As long as they get plenty of attention, etc.

    I am a bit concerned you got him at 7 weeks. That’s a week too young to take him from his mother. Usually most breeders don’t let pups go until they are 8 weeks. It’s really important you are super careful with those sensitive joints. Absolutely no rough play ! Even if he wants to.

    Just be consistent in your training and he’ll be fine. Don’t overly spoil him when he’s with you unless you are specifically training him.

    I always recommend the work of John Dunbar or Victoria Stillwell. They work so well with positive reinforcement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-NBJfZM_RY

    Very best wishes,
    Jon

    *Jon Buscall, PhD*
    Web: jontusmedia.com
    Twitter: @jonbuscall
    Skype: jonbuscall
    Email: jon@jontusmedia.com
    Tel: +46 76 863 72 85

  • sophie

    Well actually the mom was taken away with the rest of the puppies 2 weeks ago(its a long story) :/ hes been with his daddy. He was born june 1st. Thats why im wondering if I should still leave him with his dad 3-4 days a week. And I had no idea I had to be carefull with exercises, hes been running a lot playing the pas 2 days, I will defenetly be really carefull. Thats my little guy :)
    Im wondering also, would he learn be potty trained more easily if hes with his dad? Or that probably wont make a difference.
    Thank you so much, Im really glad I found this page :)

  • http://jontusmedia.com/ Jon Buscall

    Following another dog will help with toilet training because he’ll see what he has to do. Just remember he needs lots of reward and praise for going outside. Bassets are notoriously hard to toilet train but they get there!
    Yes, definitely be careful with play. Especially if he’s around a fully grown adult male dog. He’s a dwarf dog: i.e. a big dog on very short legs and that leg mechanism needs to grow carefully and properly. All basset breeders I know warn against stairs, jumping off the sofa, rough and tumble, etc, until he’s much bigger. It’s a pain the first few months with breeds like this but if you don’t take care of them as they are growing you can get no end of problems later.

    If he gets boisterous and wants to burn off energy, use his mind! He’ll love scent training and games that use his nose.

    *Jon Buscall, PhD*
    Web: jontusmedia.com
    Twitter: @jonbuscall
    Skype: jonbuscall
    Email: jon@jontusmedia.com
    Tel: +46 76 863 72 85